Here was born Louis XIV

Pavillon
Henri IV

Formerly the residence of the Sun King LOUIS XIV, Le Pavillon Henri IV welcomes you in an exceptional setting with a panorama over the Seine Valley to Paris.

This 4-star hotel opened at the beginning of the 19th century has the soul of a residence of yesteryear and houses 42 rooms, a restaurant, as well as reception and seminar rooms.

“Our restaurant and our bar will be closed from Saturday December 24 to Wednesday December 28 inclusive”.

Notre hôtel du début du 19e siècle a l'atmosphère d'une demeure d'antan.

Story
& Tradition

The Pavillon Henri IV is built on the Terrasse de Saint-Germain, on the very site of the Old Royal Castle.
The construction work of the Château Neuf began under the reign of Henri II in 1556 by Philibert Delorme then the Château was enlarged and embellished from 1589 under King Henri IV. The architects are Jean de Fourcy, J.B. Androuet du Cerceau then Louis Metezeau.

The buildings were completed around 1603 and the court settled there. The Château Neuf became a royal residence under Henri IV then Louis XIII and Louis XIV until 1660, when the court found itself obliged to move to the old feudal building until the installation in Versailles. On the night of September 4 to 5, Anne of Austria felt the pains of childbirth and gave birth to Louis Dieudonné, the future Louis XIV, on September 5, 1638.

The salon in which the Sun King was born is currently one of the salons of the Pavillon Henri IV and is listed as a historical monument. With the accession of Louis XIV begins for Saint Germain the most prosperous period of its history.

Benefits
& Services

4 star hotel
42 rooms
1 panoramic restaurant
1 bar in the large gallery and its lounge areas
Reception rooms
Daylight meeting rooms
Terrace with an exceptional view of the Seine Valley
Large free private car park

Customers

"The King's Favorite Residence"

From 1666 until 1682, the royal city became the King’s favorite residence. But in April 1682, Louis XIV abandoned Saint Germain en Laye for Versailles.

In 1777, it was owned by the Count of Artois, brother of Louis XVI, the future Charles X. But the castle was uninhabitable when Louis XVI donated it to his brother.
In 1779, the demolition in order to rebuild a building on more solid foundations begins.

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